The Slow Bone

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Smoked in Texas: Smoke-Brined Fried Chicken

The best fried chicken in Dallas is served at a barbecue joint. Any self-respecting pitmaster might cringe when I suggest the fried chicken to prospective customers, but chef and pitmaster Jeffrey Hobbs at the Slow Bone Barbeque in Dallas is plenty proud of his unique smoke-brined fried chicken. Hobbs credits their chicken supplier as a factor in the fried chicken’s taste. They use the same supplier as Chicken Express for both the fried and the…

Barbecue Crossfire

The nation is talking about Texas’s new open carry policy, and two pistol-packing pitmasters are grabbing headlines for their opposing views. Trent Brooks, of Brooks Place BBQ, welcomes open carriers to his Cypress barbecue trailer, and in fact offers a ten percent discount for anyone showing off their firearm (the 25 percent discount reported by many was just for New Years Day); on the flip side, Jack Perkins of Slow Bone Barbeque in Dallas is asking gun owners to…

More than Leftovers at Slow Bone

When Jack Perkins opened the Slow Bone in Dallas last year, it was with a standard barbecue menu. Since then he’s been tinkering with ways to use up leftover meat. Perkins doesn’t want to serve you yesterday’s ribs, but throwing them out would be bad business sense, not to mention disrespectful to the animal. This no-waste goal has led him into some uncommon menu territory compared to most barbecue joints, but these aren’t your grandma’s…

Photo by Nicholas McWhirter

Texas’s Best BBQ Sandwiches

At Prause Meat Market in La Grange, there is a green paper sign right next to the barbecue counter. It reads “Sorry We Do NOT Make Sandwiches.” It’s a reminder to customers that this is a meat market where meat—smoked or raw—is sold by the pound. If you want a sandwich, you’ve got to bring your own bread. Others in Texas are more accommodating. Some barbecue joints make a pretty incredible sandwich that goes beyond…

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The Best Method for Reheating Barbecue

The barbecue you eat can’t always be fresh. Maybe grandma sent you a brisket in a care package. Sometimes you might even have some leftover ribs. So, what is the best method to reheat it? While eating around the state I know that even in the hands of a microwave maestro, brisket is never going to be great if you hear a DING coming from the kitchen. Throw a fully smoked rack of ribs straight…