TMBBQ Buzz

Comments from our joint finder app.
Brisket ribs sausage were ok
David Monasmith @ Evett’s Bar-B-Que, 2016-04-28 17:06:11
If you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all. Best thing I had was the Dr. Pepper.
Stevew @ Mike?s Real Pit Bar-B-Q, 2016-04-28 13:19:11
Po-boy sandwich was pretty good this late
David Monasmith @ Bill Miller's Bar-B-Q, 2016-04-28 02:12:54
Came here based on review over a year old. Since on way up I35, not much to lose. Place looks like old gas station conversion. Inside there are lots of trophies for Bbq cook offs mainly in the 90's. Very family oriented. So the food. I ordered 2 meat special of brisket and chicken along with side of coleslaw. Brisket was lean-should have asked for moist but overall it has good taste and flavor even though dry. It did fall apart so that's good or would not be able to eat-no chewiness. Dipping in sauce improved flavor as very little smoke ring. Sauce has a bit of a kick-cayenne? Overall I give brisket 3 out of 5 for moistness and 3.5 for taste. The chicken was moist and looked like dry rub with spices. Not much of any smoke flavor until dip into sauce. I would give it a 3.5 out of 5. Cole slaw was a bit on sweet side but had good crispness. 2.5 out of 5.
Terry r @ Fat Boy’s BBQ, 2016-04-27 18:16:11
Chopped and a coke there chopped I always good
douglas78@aol.com @ Sammie’s Bar-B-Q, 2016-04-27 01:30:10
First timer but not the last!
wshivers72 @ Kreuz Market, 2016-04-25 16:40:17
Holy smoke this place is good! Slice brisket and pulled pork were amazing in the tangy, vinegary sauce that built up a nice, slow burn over multiple bites. Opted for regular sausage over jalapeño cheese. It was OK, but I prefer the kind made with meat loosely held in the casing. Will come back again to try more of the menu & enjoy the banquet-hall-like interior.
LonghornBBQR @ Cousin’s Bar-B-Q, 2016-04-23 22:29:41
Jalapanio sausage bland taste like Hot Dog.
@ The Big Bib BBQ, 2016-04-23 17:48:31
More Buzz →

Review

Hickory House BBQ 03

June 10, 2014

Johnny Doyle cooks on a gas-rotisserie, but he’d do it differently if he could. He takes pride in the barbecue he puts out in his nearly forty year old Denison restaurant, so when he had pit fire that destroyed his Oylers, he wanted to replace them. “[J&R Manufacturing] told me it would be a couple months before I could get an Oyler built, so I bought two Southern Prides instead.” Now he just can’t get the bark to set on his ribs like he’d like to. I can’t be sure if it’s the cook or the cooker, but he’s right.

Hickory House BBQ 01

The ribs were tender and came away nicely from the bone. They even had a good smokiness, but the rub sat atop the meat like wet sawdust. The meat and rub had not become one, and there was no bark to speak of. That textural variation of crisp crust and moist meat is what makes a dry-rubbed rib so pleasing, but this rib was crying for some sauce. Luckily, they make a couple good ones here. The tomato-based version wasn’t too sweet with just a touch of vinegar, and livened up the ribs nicely.

Doyle’s other sauce is a regional specialty. He makes a brown gravy sauce from the flour-thickened pit drippings. It’s thick and heavily seasoned, and makes for great Texas toast dipping.

Brown Gravy 13

Hickory House brown gravy sauce

Johnny and his wife Shawn make all the sides too. In fact, there isn’t much here that’s not from scratch. If you’re used to beans from the can, a trip through Sherman, Denison, Bells, and Bonham will be a pinto bean revelation. They know how to cook them in these parts. There are few ingredients and they aren’t fortified with leftover chunks of barbecue. They’re just beans that are well cooked in a pot for long hours and seasoned with just enough salt. A side of potato salad was anything but store-bought. Chunks of egg, nearly-mashed potatoes, and good kick of yellow mustard made for a bright counterpoint to the beans. Side are also self-serve along the cafeteria line, so you can get a few spoonfuls if you like.

Hickory House BBQ 02

Then there’s the brisket. In these parts you normally need to beg for any crust to be left on the meat. The fatty end is usually chopped for sandwiches, and the sauce on the side is a foreign concept. But Johnny Doyle does it differently. A nice line of rendered fat hid beneath a crunchy bark created from hours in the pit, and few on the steam table. Brisket in the mid-afternoon is usually dried out when held in this manner, but the Hickory House beef was juicy and tender. There was plenty of smoke, pepper, and salt to flavor it too.

Maybe the ribs were better back before the pit fire, but it looks like Doyle has found his sweet spot with the brisket. He recognized me just before I left, and asked me for some tips on the ribs. I’m not sure if it was for flattery or if he was really looking to improve, but it’d be worth returning to find out as long as he keeps serving brisket like that.

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